Jamestown to Jamestown: Letters to an African Child

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Jamestown to Jamestown: Letters to an African Child

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Kojo Yankah, a journalist, creative writer, author of nine books, Pan-Africanist, and founder of the African University College of Communications, in Accra, Ghana, narrates through ‘Letters to an African Child” the painful struggles of black people to earn equality, justice and freedom, from the slave dungeons in Ghana, West Africa (Jamestown) to Jamestown, Virginia, with hindsight of their proud hidden African civilization. Available in both Hard Cover and Paperback.

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Young people of all races are mostly oblivious to the reality of the struggles of “African people” historically and contemporarily. They do not know there has been a conscious effort to eliminate this history; and, they have been deceived in such a way to suggest that “it” [the history] never existed. Kojo Yankah, in his book, From Jamestown to Jamestown: Letters to an African Child, has chronicled the true history of Africa and the Diaspora during a critical period in a manner that will gain the attention of folk across races, across continents, and across generations. His unique approach to sharing history through letters is sure to create a readership that is more informed about the history of African people throughout the Diaspora. This is a “must read” book which traces the African people from Jamestown, Africa to Jamestown, Virginia highlighting their journey and their challenges along the way. - Joseph H. Silver, Ph.D 

From Jamestown to Jamestown: Letters to an African Child, is a thoughtfully refreshing account of African history that pensively reflects the ancestral wisdom of our African forebears that urges lions to tell their own stories instead of relying on stories that hunters always tell to glorify themselves, at the ruinous expense of lions. In a word, Efo Kojo tells the lions’ tale of African history to a young African ( and to older ones as well), Ayesha - she who lives; and it is only when Africans can tell their own stories from their perspective that they can amply safeguard their ever-abiding consciousness and substantial identity. The admirably skillful way in which the author manages to tell the story in the form of letters, manageable doses of life-sustaining historical information, and all in language that is not perceptively intimidating, should appeal, especially, to Ayesha and her generation. And the value of the information contained in the book may be found in the question, “what would become of our children if they possessed the information contained in this book?” This is a must reading for Ayesha and her contemporaries as well as their parents and grandparents. - Kofi Asare Opoku, Professor, Africana Studies